Home > Fiction > The Greatest of Muses

The Greatest of Muses

It is time for Barbara Beacham’s “Mondays Finish the Story” here at the Drali blog. We get a photo and a starting sentence to prompt us to write our 150 word story.

My title this week is rather ironic since my muse is absent today. I blame it on a very busy day at work. The genre for my story this week, therefore, is “wishy-washy”. It’s a few words over, but after researching the invention date of the typewriter I had to make some last minute adjustments.

The supplied sentence is in bold in my story, and to read this week’s other contributions, click on the little blue froggy.

2015-02-23-bw-beacham

Copyright Barbara Beacham

 

The old typewriter had a mind of its ownA mind, and a flair for the creative.

As quill, pencil and typewriter, Underwood (for that was now his name) had steered many of the greats. Where would they have been without him? Austen with her ridiculously-titled “Pride and Peanuts”? Or Tolkein’s “The Hedgehog” and planned three-parter “Lord of the Hedgerows”? Underwood had soon put them straight, working tirelessly behind the scenes. Even stubborn Dickens had been persuaded to change direction only three pages into “A Christmas Singalong With Mulled Wine and Whatnot”.

Now everyone used computers. Pah! Soulless machines. He would never stoop to inhabiting such a beast. A typewriter he would remain.

So he couldn’t connect to Facebook. So what? One of the greatest muses of all time, reduced to a paper weight. Yesterday’s news.

So no-one was more surprised than Underwood when his owner’s son came in from school, threw his iPad on the bed, sat at the desk, loaded some paper – and began to type.

  1. February 23, 2015 at 9:23 pm

    Nearly choked on my wine because of “Pride and Peanuts”. You managed fine without the muse in my opinion. Great ending!

    Like

    • February 24, 2015 at 8:45 am

      I guess my muse usually tells me to have a twist at the end, but that’s not always necessary 🙂
      Glad you liked it!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. February 23, 2015 at 10:57 pm

    The Hedgehog! Brilliant! It’s like Tolkein from a different dimension
    And this is without your muse? I think it is great, and that ending is wonderful.

    Like

    • February 24, 2015 at 8:46 am

      I’m glad you liked the ending. It took ages to get the wording right 🙂

      Like

  3. February 23, 2015 at 11:10 pm

    Very good Sir, I did enjoy this and yes the mind boggles at what this typewriter could have come up with had it been in the hands of the famous authors.

    Like

    • February 24, 2015 at 8:47 am

      Who knows what works of genius it could have inspired? Glad you liked it!

      Like

  4. February 24, 2015 at 1:48 am

    I had a typewriter exactly like that. I think my son still has it somewhere. I do NOT miss typewriters. My wrists are grateful too 🙂

    Like

    • February 24, 2015 at 8:47 am

      I never spent much time with typewriters, but there was quite a bit of hammering involved 🙂

      Like

  5. February 24, 2015 at 2:51 am

    I laughed over “Pride and Peanuts.” and was laughing hysterically by the time I read the title “Lord of the Hedgrows!” Having my evening cocktail and reading this story made my drink go up my nose over the Dickens titled “A Christmas Singalong With Mulled Wine and Whatnot.”

    Oh, my word, thank you for participating in the MFtS challenge! This post is over the top! I was truly hoping that folks would enjoy writing about this 1926 typewriter, and you nailed this story! What fun!

    I hope that you come back for next week’s challenge! It should be a jumping fun time! Be well… ^..^

    Like

    • February 24, 2015 at 8:49 am

      Sorry about your nose, but I’m glad I made you laugh!
      The “Classics” could have been very different without this typewriter involved. I’m glad you enjoyed it 🙂

      “jumping fun time” – is that a hint for next week’s picture? 🙂

      Like

  6. February 24, 2015 at 4:15 am

    LOL! He’s out of paperweight retirement! Very entertaining Drali, I loved it.

    Like

  7. February 24, 2015 at 6:31 am

    Your muse today was just hiding in the typewriter! Excellent!

    Like

    • February 24, 2015 at 8:51 am

      I think it was my inability to fit this into a particular genre particularly given the humour at the start and then the ending which was – what? – I’m not sure, that made me worry a bit about this story.
      I’m glad you enjoyed it!

      Liked by 1 person

  8. February 24, 2015 at 2:36 pm

    Good story. I’ve typed on regular typewriters portable, word processors, electrics, and my personal favorite is a computer. I couldn’t tolerate the carbon paper and erasers any more. Well done, Ali. 🙂 — Suzanne

    Like

    • February 24, 2015 at 8:15 pm

      My Dad had an electric typewriter before I persuaded him to buy a computer. It had a little screen and a memory buffer so at least he could proof-read before committing to paper!

      Like

  9. February 24, 2015 at 9:05 pm

    I like your titles much more than the originals – so much more creative. And who, indeed, needs Facebook? A seriously excellent post, Ali – with or without your muse today. Your sense of humour knows no bounds. 🙂

    Like

    • February 25, 2015 at 7:58 am

      Yes, it’s almost a shame that Underwood changed things around. I’m glad you liked it 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  10. February 24, 2015 at 10:08 pm

    I’m very curious as to what the stories of ‘Pride and Peanuts’ and ‘The Hedgehog’ would have been like! Great story – even without your muse. 🙂

    Like

    • February 25, 2015 at 7:58 am

      Maybe I should write “Pride and Peanuts” – the great untold story. It sounds fun!

      Liked by 1 person

  11. February 24, 2015 at 11:02 pm

    LOL! 😀

    Like

  12. Lyn
    February 24, 2015 at 11:12 pm

    Oh D-man, you never fail to entertain. Where did you think up those alternative titles? Just brilliant and as others have said, superb ending 😀

    Like

    • February 25, 2015 at 8:01 am

      It did take me a little while to think of the alternatives. I’m glad you liked it 🙂

      Like

  13. February 25, 2015 at 2:10 am

    I agree with “afairymind”–I’d like to see those originals–nice take!

    Like

  14. February 25, 2015 at 3:08 am

    I see the typewriter came up with the title for this story! That Underwood…. always the egotist…

    Like

    • February 25, 2015 at 8:04 am

      I typed “Some Old Typewriter” but somehow it came out as “The Greatest of Muses”. Weird.

      Like

  15. latasun
    February 26, 2015 at 12:42 pm

    thats a funny take.. Lord of the Hedgerows indeed!

    Like

  16. March 1, 2015 at 5:05 am

    Very entertaining and funny story. I was LOL as I read. 🙂

    Like

    • March 1, 2015 at 6:37 am

      I’m glad you liked it! I had some trouble thinking up a story this week.

      Like

  17. March 8, 2015 at 3:11 am

    I grew up with the typewriter. I truly wish I could hear my computer click!

    Like

    • March 8, 2015 at 5:47 am

      There was something nice about the sound and the feel of the keys (though I never got to use a real typewriter very much).

      Liked by 1 person

  18. NotAPunkRocker
    March 12, 2015 at 8:14 pm

    If this is what you can come up with when your muse is absent, I am super-envious then!

    Like

    • March 12, 2015 at 8:27 pm

      Aw, fanks 🙂
      I had trouble thinking of a story and just splurged silliness onto the page. It seemed to work out in the end, though.

      Like

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